Heart Attack Causes, Symptoms and Prevention

Heart Attack: Causes, Symptoms and Prevention

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Heart Attack: Causes, Symptoms and Prevention

The heart wall, called the myocardium, is actually a muscle that provides blood circulation by performing pumping. When an artery is blocked during a heart attack, this muscle tissue is deprived of oxygenated blood. An infarction occurs when the lack of oxygen becomes so severe that a large number of cells die. In the medical context, heart failure is designated as acute myocardial infarction (Mi). A heart attack is a very serious condition, but going to the hospital without delay greatly increases your chances of survival.

Causes

All organs need oxygenated blood to maintain function, and the myocardium (the muscle that forms the wall of the heart) is no exception. The coronary arteries provide their own oxygen supply chain. In case of a lack of coronary arteries, fatty deposits (plaques) form on the inner walls of the coronary arteries, which reduce their diameter and, as a result, have the ability to transmit blood flow to the heart. This process corresponds to the development of atherosclerosis.

Most heart attacks occur when a rupture of the lining of an artery releases atherosclerotic plaque. The blood then forms a clot in the damaged artery, and the presence of blood can partially or completely block blood flow. When the obstruction becomes large enough, symptoms of a heart attack appear and soon the heart muscle cells begin to die, which is called a heart attack. Rarely, spasms of muscle tissue in the walls of arteries that look healthy stop blood flow and rarely cause a heart attack, but the cause is mostly unidentifiable.

Symptoms

Most victims of heart attack experience certain symptoms several days before the attack. Chest pain is the common symptom. Chest pain occurs when the heart muscle does not get enough oxygen and is a disorder called ischemia. As the heart attack approaches, the angina is likely to get worse or become more frequent. Other symptoms, such as extreme fatigue and shortness of breath, may occur.

People with angina may have difficulty distinguishing between symptoms of angina and pain from a heart attack. Symptoms of a heart attack are usually much stronger and more persistent than those of angina (more than 20 minutes). Rest and medications used to soothe angina pectoris slightly or temporarily relieve symptoms of a heart attack.

Many people report that it feels like a warning when a heart attack is imminent. The involvement can be preceded by chest tightness, tightness, pain, and “constriction” of the chest. The pain can also reach the back, jaw, shoulder or arm (especially the left arm). The heart rate may accelerate and become irregular. Usually, chest pain is a preliminary symptom, but almost 20% of people who have a heart attack do not experience chest pain.

Prevention

One approach, primarily focused on preventing heart attack, is to identify and then suppress risk factors such as smoking, obesity, high cholesterol and a high fat diet. Talk to your doctor about lifestyle and risk factors that may change, including:

  • Smoking to think about giving up;
  • Physical activity that should include regular exercise in everyday life-this exercise contributes to weight loss and cholesterol reduction.
  • A diet you may need to discuss with your nutritionist about healthy foods that may contribute to lowering cholesterol.

The heart wall, called the myocardium, is actually a muscle that provides blood circulation by performing pumping. When an artery is blocked during a heart attack, this muscle tissue is deprived of oxygenated blood. An infarction occurs when the lack of oxygen becomes so severe that a large number of cells die. In the medical context, heart failure is designated as acute myocardial infarction (Mi). A heart attack is a very serious condition, but going to the hospital without delay greatly increases your chances of survival.

Causes

All organs need oxygenated blood to maintain function, and the myocardium (the muscle that forms the wall of the heart) is no exception. The coronary arteries provide their own oxygen supply chain. In case of a lack of coronary arteries, fatty deposits (plaques) form on the inner walls of the coronary arteries, which reduce their diameter and, as a result, have the ability to transmit blood flow to the heart. This process corresponds to the development of atherosclerosis.

Most heart attacks occur when a rupture of the lining of an artery releases atherosclerotic plaque. The blood then forms a clot in the damaged artery, and the presence of blood can partially or completely block blood flow. When the obstruction becomes large enough, symptoms of a heart attack appear and soon the heart muscle cells begin to die, which is called a heart attack. Rarely, spasms of muscle tissue in the walls of arteries that look healthy stop blood flow and rarely cause a heart attack, but the cause is mostly unidentifiable.

Symptoms

Most victims of heart attack experience certain symptoms several days before the attack. Chest pain is the common symptom. Chest pain occurs when the heart muscle does not get enough oxygen and is a disorder called ischemia. As the heart attack approaches, the angina is likely to get worse or become more frequent. Other symptoms, such as extreme fatigue and shortness of breath, may occur.

People with angina may have difficulty distinguishing between symptoms of angina and pain from a heart attack. Symptoms of a heart attack are usually much stronger and more persistent than those of angina (more than 20 minutes). Rest and medications used to soothe angina pectoris slightly or temporarily relieve symptoms of a heart attack.

Many people report that it feels like a warning when a heart attack is imminent. The involvement can be preceded by chest tightness, tightness, pain, and “constriction” of the chest. The pain can also reach the back, jaw, shoulder or arm (especially the left arm). The heart rate may accelerate and become irregular. Usually, chest pain is a preliminary symptom, but almost 20% of people who have a heart attack do not experience chest pain.

Prevention

One approach, primarily focused on preventing heart attack, is to identify and then suppress risk factors such as smoking, obesity, high cholesterol and a high fat diet. Talk to your doctor about lifestyle and risk factors that may change, including:

  • Smoking to think about giving up;
  • Physical activity that should include regular exercise in everyday life-this exercise contributes to weight loss and cholesterol reduction.
  • A diet you may need to discuss with your nutritionist about healthy foods that may contribute to lowering cholesterol.